Priming and the Basketball Coach, or Choose Your Words Carefully

In his book Blink, Malcolm Gladwell describes an experiment done by Yale University psychologist, John Bargh. The experiment was rather simple really, but the results are fascinating. Imagine that I’m

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Sometimes, your team needs a little help getting the action of the Read & React Offense started. Sometimes, you see a weakness in the defense that your players just won’t

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The following clip is another excerpt from our 5 DVD set, Read & React Clinics: Planning the R&R Practice. If you’ve ever had questions about implementing the Read & React

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[This video clip is taken from DVD #3 of our 5 DVD set, Read & React Clinics: Planning the R&R Practice.] The Read & React Offense never asks a player

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We’ve recently posted a lot about Read & React diagnostics (Testing Layers 1-3 and Testing Layers 1 & 4). There’s a good reason for that. Most coaches don’t know when

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[The video clip below is an excerpt from Practice Template #2 in our DVD set, Read & React Clinics: Planning the R&R Practice. This is a 5 DVD compilation set

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The Read & React Offense is built on a backbone of two major components: Pass & Cut (Layer 1) and Circle Movement (Layer 4). Many of the other layers hang

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This is another excerpt from our newest project, Read & React Clinics: Planning the R&R Practice. If you haven’t noticed yet, what we’ve been doing over the last few posts

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[The video clip below is an excerpt from Practice Template 1 in our DVD set, Read & React Clinics: Planning the R&R Practice.] No basketball coach has enough practice time.

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The question often comes up, “How do I know when our Read & React team should add new layers?” Simple answer: when the previous layer (or bundle of layers if

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