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Iowa University Game Clips – H

Iowa University Game Clips – H

Random Mix of Read & React Layers

Clip 1: This looks like a simple drive to the basket – and it is. But it also illustrates an important point about the flexibility of the Read & React. There are no set plays or set actions. She’s not required to use the ball screen (like she would be in a set play). So, when the defense crowds her and overplays her, she’s free to take what’s given to her – in this case, a lay-up.

Clip 2: Pass & Cut action and rules: After a couple of passes with cuts, #21 Kachine fills the empty spot. Her defender trails her. Just like it’s drilled, Kachine curls to the basket – essentially, a face-cut or front-cut.

Clip 3: The Read & React allows coaches the freedom to play their post(s) wherever they like. With their post player at the high post, ball screens are readily available for the Iowa guards whenever they like. Good North-South penetration by #2 Kamille requires the defense to help in the lane. Notice that’s too deep for the defense to successfully close out on the pitch. This is the first Layer of Dribble Actions to be installed in the Read & React.

Clip 4: #2 Kamille sees a chance to set a Pin Screen for #20 Kelly. However, the defense fights around the bottom side. Kelly goes over the top and turns the Pin Screen into a Back Screen for a lay-up. The Read & React is a player’s offense!

Clip 5: Good hunting: 6 Pass & Cuts + 2 Ball Screens = a defensive breakdown that allows a drive for a lay-up. Trick dogs can only perform tricks at the command of the trainer. But hunting dogs hunt until they find what they’re after.

Clip 6: How can #20 Kelly make it all the way to goal for a lay-up with help defense so close? Answer: The defense is being occupied by #2 Kamille who is trying to set a back-screen for #24 Printy. Here’s the order of events: When #20 Kelly receives the ball up top, #2 Kamille makes the Read Line Rear Cut but is not open and chooses to back-screen her way out. In the meantime, Kelly is overplayed and sees a gap to the goal. The help defender on Printy is distracted by the back screen attempt just enough for Kelly to get to the rim. At this level, it is the combination of Layers that creates the scoring opportunities.

Clip 7: #11 Trisha uses 5 dribbles and spin move to get to the rim without any interference from help defense. Ordinarily, if you use traditional offenses at this level, the use of 5 dribbles and a bunch of moves would not work. However, the Read & React actions, reactions, and spacing of those without the ball keep the defense occupied.

Clip 8: Feed the Post & Laker Cut – straight out of the Post Play Layers: The post drops a bounce pass to the cutter. The Laker Cut flows to the Dribble Penetration Basic Post Slide Layer, i.e., the post slides down while the post defender stops the ball. So, why isn’t the second pass successful (the dish to the post)? Because it’s not a bounce pass. Pitching to the perimeter should be in the air. But Dishing toward the basket should be bounced. Regardless, this is a good example of linking two Layers together.

Clip 9: 5out formation: This is a good combo of Pass & Cut + 2 Read Line Cuts that lead to a successful Pass & Front Cut. I think it’s also a good example of not forcing things; instead, they move the defense and wait for a clean cut with a clear passing window.

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