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The Tribe

Here are some Read & React clips from Shorter University men (from the 2010 season). This is Shorter's first year with the offense, but these clips will demonstrate how linking just the first 6 layers can be effective, even at the collegiate level. Clips 1 & 2: Here you can see Pass & Cut followed by the Draft Drive (for more info about the Draft Drive, see this earlier post). Basically, after a few passes and cuts, the ball handler drives off the tail of the previous cutter. You can see how the cutter drags his defender out of help-side position, opening up a seam for the penetration to get to the rim. Even in Clip 2, when the penetration comes late, the help-side defender is so preoccupied with the filling cutter that he doesn't even notice the drive until it is too late.

In a previous post, we took the Pass & Cut layer and added some depth to the options. That gave us the Puppy Dog Front Cut and the Draft Drive. Now, in Layer 2, we'll look at going deeper into the Post Cuts - notice that I've used the Laker Cut in the examples, but the other Post Cuts (X and Relocate) could work too. These are clips from the University of Iowa, but the principles (especially in these early layers) can be used at all levels. Next time you want to add something to your Read & React attack, at least consider going deeper in the layers you already have in place rather than defaulting to adding more layers. You may be surprised at what you can get.

On March 1st of 2010, we started this Tribe project for all of those coaches running the Read & React. It was designed to provide you with ongoing tips, resources, and community to help you constantly improve as a Read & React coach. But, of course,...

Over the last few weeks, we've been fleshing out a 5 part series on Read & React Quick Hitters. This is our fourth installment - you can find the three previous here, here, and here.

This is an easy 4 OUT Quick Hitter that utilizes the Post as a scoring opportunity and as a screener. 4 OUT Quick Hitter
1 passes and cuts (1st Option). If 1 is not open, then 1 screens for 5 in the short corner. 5 cuts to the front of the rim (2nd option).

In our previous post, we talked about the option of going deeper into certain layers of the Read & React rather than constantly pushing to add more layers. At the same time, a team who has established themselves in the R&R can continue to build nuances into their offense to make it more dynamic (and ultimately harder to guard). To illustrate this point, I put together some clips from the NCAA Division 1 University of Iowa Women’s team. This kind of depth exists in almost every layer of the Read & React. Many of you are already aware of this “Simple, yet Complex” aspect of the Read & React. But for those who aren’t, especially youth coaches, I hope you can see how to squeeze even more out of Layer 1 than just the most basic actions.